Tech tips

Be wary of fake LinkedIn emails

We have noticed a sharp increase in fake LinkedIn invite emails in the last few days.

If you get a LinkedIn invite, we suggest you don’t click any of the links in the email. Instead, log into your LinkedIn account using http://www.linkedin.com and check if the invites are genuine.

Here is an example of the fake emails:

Fake LinkedIn email

Tip: How to shut down or restart Windows 8 the quick way

Newer users of Windows 8 could be forgiven for getting frustrated at the menu navigation needed to do simple tasks such as log off, reboot or shut down.

Fortunately, there is a much quicker way to do this. Simply go to your desktop (this does not work in the “metro” interface) and press ALT+F4.

A window like this will appear:

Winndows 8 shutdown menu

 

 

 

 

 

 

From here you can do the familiar actions such as switch user, log off, shut down and restart.

Windows 8 keyboard shortcuts

Windows 8 Logo

New to Windows 8? Microsoft have included a huge array of keyboard shortcuts to help you navigate around the new menu systems. Here is a list of Windows 8 specific keyboard shortcuts:

Windows key: Switch between Modern Desktop Start screen and the last accessed application

Windows key + C: Access the charms bar 

Windows key + Tab: Access the Modern Desktop Taskbar

Windows key + I: Access the Settings charm

Windows key + H: Access the Share charm

Windows key + K: Access the Devices charm

Windows key + Q: Access the Apps Search screen

Windows key + F: Access the Files Search screen

Windows key + W: Access the Settings Search screen

Windows key + P: Access the Second Screen bar

Windows key + Z: Brings up the App Bar when you have a Modern Desktop App running

Windows key + X: Access the Windows Tools Menu

Windows key + O: Lock screen orientation

Windows key + . : Move the screen split to the right

Windows key + Shift + . : Move the screen split to the left

Windows key + V: View all active Toasts/Notifications

Windows key + Shift + V: View all active Toasts/Notifications in reverse order

Windows key + PrtScn: Takes a screenshot of the screen and automatically saves it in the Pictures folder as Screenshot

Windows key + Enter: Launch Narrator

Windows key + E: Open Computer

Windows key + R: Open the Run dialog box

Windows key + U: Open Ease of Access Center

Windows key + Ctrl + F: Open Find Computers dialog box

Windows key + Pause/Break: Open the System page

Windows key + 1..10: Launch a program pinned on the Taskbar in the position indicated by the number

Windows key + Shift + 1..10: Launch a new instance of a program pinned on the Taskbar in the position indicated by the number

Windows key + Ctrl + 1..10: Access the last active instance of a program pinned on the Taskbar in the position indicated by the number

Windows key + Alt + 1..10: Access the Jump List of a program pinned on the Taskbar in the position indicated by the number

Windows key + B: Select the first item in the Notification Area and then use the arrow keys to cycle through the items Press Enter to open the selected item

Windows key + Ctrl + B: Access the program that is displaying a message in the Notification Area

Windows key + T: Cycle through the items on the Taskbar

Windows key + M: Minimize all windows

Windows key + Shift + M: Restore all minimized windows

Windows key + D: Show/Hide Desktop (minimize/restore all windows)

Windows key + L: Lock computer

Windows key + Up Arrow: Maximize current window

Windows key + Down Arrow: Minimize/restore current window W

indows key + Home: Minimize all but the current window

Windows key + Left Arrow: Tile window on the left side of the screen

Windows key + Right Arrow: Tile window on the right side of the screen

Windows key + Shift + Up Arrow: Extend current window from the top to the bottom of the screen

Windows key + Shift + Left/Right Arrow: Move the current window from one monitor to the next

Windows key + F1: Launch Windows Help and Support

PageUp: Scroll forward on the Modern Desktop Start screen

PageDown: Scroll backward on the Modern Desktop Start screen

Esc: Close  a charm

Ctrl + Esc: Switch between Modern Desktop Start screen and the last accessed application

Ctrl + Mouse scroll wheel: Activate the Semantic Zoom on the Modern Desktop screen

Alt: Display a hidden Menu Bar

Alt + D: Select the Address Bar

Alt + P: Display the Preview Pane in Windows Explorer

 lt + Tab: Cycle forward through open windows

Alt + Shift + Tab: Cycle backward through open windows

Alt + F: Close the current window Open the Shut Down Windows dialog box from the Desktop

Alt + Spacebar: Access the Shortcut menu for current window

Alt + Esc: Cycle between open programs in the order that they were opened

lt + Enter: Open the Properties dialog box of the selected item

Alt + PrtScn: Take a screen shot of the active Window and place it in the clipboard

Alt + Up Arrow: Move up one folder level in Windows Explorer (Like the Up Arrow in XP)

Alt + Left Arrow: Display the previous folder

Alt + Right Arrow: Display the next folder

Shift + Insert: CD/DVD Load CD/DVD without triggering Autoplay or Autorun

Shift + Delete: Permanently delete the item (rather than sending it to the Recycle Bin)

Shift + F6: Cycle backward through elements in a window or dialog box

Shift + F10: Access the context menu for the selected item

Shift + Tab: Cycle backward through elements in a window or dialog box

Shift + Click: Select a consecutive group of items

Shift + Click on a Taskbar button: Launch a new instance of a program

Shift + Right-click on a Taskbar button: Access the context menu for the selected item

Ctrl + A: Select all items

Ctrl + C: Copy the selected item

Ctrl + X: Cut the selected item

Ctrl + V: Paste the selected item

Ctrl + D: Delete selected item

Ctrl + Z: Undo an action

Ctrl + Y: Redo an action

Ctrl + N: Open a new window in Windows Explorer

Ctrl + W: Close current window in Windows Explorer

Ctrl + E: Select the Search box in the upper right corner of a window

Ctrl + Shift + N: Create new folder

Ctrl + Shift + Esc: Open the Windows Task Manager

Ctrl + Alt + Tab: Use arrow keys to cycle through open windows

Ctrl + Alt + Delete: Access the Windows Security screen

Ctrl + Click: Select multiple individual items

Ctrl + Click and drag an item: Copies that item in the same folder

Ctrl + Shift + Click and drag an item: Creates a shortcut for that item in the same folder

Ctrl + Tab:  Move forward through tabs

Ctrl + Shift + Tab: Move backward through tabs

Ctrl + Shift + Click on a Taskbar button: Launch a new instance of a program as an Administrator

 Ctrl + Click on a grouped Taskbar button: Cycle through the instances of a program in the group

F1: Display Help

F2: Rename a file

F3: Open Search

F4: Display the Address Bar list

F5: Refresh display

F6: Cycle forward through elements in a window or dialog box

F7: Display command history in a Command Prompt

F10: Display hidden Menu Bar

F11: Toggle full screen display

Tab: Cycle forward through elements in a window or dialog box

PrtScn: Take a screen shot of the entire screen and place it in the clipboard

Home: Move to the top of the active window

End: Move to the bottom of the active window

Delete: Delete the selected item

Backspace: Display the previous folder in Windows Explorer  Move up one folder level in Open or Save dialog box

Esc: Close a dialog box

Num Lock Enabled + Plus (+): Display the contents of the selected folder

Num Lock Enabled + Minus (-): Collapse the selected folder

Num Lock Enabled + Asterisk (*): Expand all subfolders under the selected folder

Press Shift 5 times Turn StickyKeys on or off

Hold down right Shift for 8 seconds Turn FilterKeys on or off

Hold down Num Lock for 5 seconds Turn ToggleKeys on or off

Thanks to Microsoft’s Yash Tolia for compiling the list.

Internet Explorer error “connection timed out” when server does not respond promptly

If you use Internet Explorer, in certain circumstances you may find your Internet Explorer browser shows a “connection timed out” or similar error. This will show up more often on sites that use a lot of back end processing where there may be a delay in information being sent to the browser.

The timeout limit can be set by an entry in the registry of the PC and by default for IE 7/8/9 is 60 minutes. However, there are some program installers (in particular InstallAware) that can set this as low as 10 seconds. This basically means that if a website tales longer than 10 seconds to respond, you will see a timeout error.

Fortunately, it’s easy to fix by editing the registry or by running a Microsoft Fixit

To change the default time-out setting for Internet Explorer in Internet Explorer 4 or a later version manually, follow these steps:

  1. Start Registry Editor.
  2. Locate the following subkey:
    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet Settings
  3. In this subkey you may see a DWORD entry called ReceiveTimeout. this may have a setting of 10000 (10 seconds) – if so, this is the cause of the problem.
  4. You can either delete the ReceiveTimeout DWORD entry to change back to default or set it to a custom value. To calculate the correct value, use the “SECONDSx1000 formula”. e.g if you want the time-out 5 minutes, set the value of the ReceiveTimeout entry to 300000 (300 seconds x 1000).
  5. Now restart the computer.

If you don’t see a ReceiveTimeout DWORD entry, this is not the cause of the problem. Also take care editing the registry – if you don’t know what you are doing you can cause severe damage to the PC’s operating system and we suggest you use the Microsoft Fixit here or use our remote IT support service

Why unlimited web hosting is a bad thing

Unlimited bandwidth, unlimited disk space & unlimited domains – it always seems like a great deal when looking for web hosting, the thought of just signing up and not having to worry about the resources you use on the server.

Lets look at the official definition of “unlimited”:

[quote]
1. not limited; unrestricted; unconfined: unlimited trade.
2. boundless; infinite; vast: the unlimited skies.
3. without any qualification or exception; unconditional.[/quote]

So, what’s the problem with “unlimited” hosting? Well, there’s no such thing. Both web space and bandwidth are finite items. There is only so much traffic a server can handle and that server will only have a certain amount of disk space.

You may wonder how hosts get away with selling this then – well, simply they hugely oversell their resources. They are selling you “unlimited” space and bandwidth on a server which they know has limits on resources. The reason they do this? They know that the vast majority of clients won’t use anywhere near the amount they think they will. Those who do use more resources that the hosting company would like, often fall foul of some obscure condition of the contract and will get kicked off – here’s an example in the T&C’s of an “unlimited” host I’ve just found at random with Google:

[quote]”In some cases, *** may not establish a specific amount of bandwidth, disk space and other resources, and refer to that as “Unlimited”. In all cases, the Services are intended for normal use only, and any activity that results in excessive usage that is inconsistent with normal usage patterns is strictly prohibited. *** reserves the right to suspend, discontinue or delete the accounts of Users whose use of disk space, bandwidth or other resources results in or presents the risk of degradation of service to other customers, regardless of the amount of disk space, bandwidth or other resources included in the User’s plan”[/quote]

In this example, they state “normal use only” – what exactly is normal? A site getting 10 visitors a week is normal for some, whereas others 50,000 visitors a day is “normal”.  Because the customer doesn’t know what is normal, they don’t know what is excessive – and after all, they bought “unlimited” right?

Here’s another one:

[quote]The intention of providing unlimited bandwidth is to eliminate the need to worry about bandwidth use. While there is no explicit limit we do have to ensure individual websites do not cause excessive usage that upsets or interrupts other users of the shared servers. All packages offering unlimited bandwidth are intended for personal or small business websites.[/quote]

So, they sell it as unlimited bandwidth “to eliminate the need to worry about bandwidth use”, but if the customer (in their opinion) use too much, their site goes down. This company also heavily promotes the packages as “business” and “pro”, yet in the small print they say it’s only for personal or small business websites.

At Posilan, we prefer to take a more honest approach to selling hosting – we offer excellent value packages with generous bandwidth and disk space allowances, with instant upgrade paths for when you grow – what’s more, you know exactly what you are allowed to use and we ensure the servers are able to deliver it without getting bogged down by too many customers each wanting “unlimited” resources. If you have been on an “unlimited” host and are moving over to us, you will see the difference.

Take a look at our hosting packages here: http://www.posilan.com/services/web-hosting/